• job lot of knitting machine yarn
    machine knitting

    Knitting Machine Yarn

    Machine Knitters prefer to buy yarn on a cone so that they can quickly and smoothly knit a garment without having to worry about yarn running out.  Today it is not easy to find coned yarn in your local shop but there are several online sources in the UK (you will find a list of suppliers in my next post on Resources).   You may already have a starter pack of mixed yarns or have been given/bought a job lot of mixed yarns that you are not sure about.    Is the yarn suitable for your knitting machine?  You need to check the label of the yarn.  If there is no outside…

  • getting started,  machine knitting

    Machine Ready? Lets start knitting!

    Hopefully you have read the previous posts and have now set up your machine and work area.  You have a new sponge-bar and your needles and carriage are all ready to knit. You have also ordered or found some suitable practice yarn.   You also have opened your operations manual.  We are ready to start knitting. Threading the Yarn Mast First thing to do is to setup your yarn mast and thread it with your yarn as shown in your manual.  The tension dial should be set according to the thickness of your yarn. Setting Your Tension (NB: when the knitting machine manual describes yarn for the standard gauge tension mast…

  • getting started,  machine knitting

    Setting Up Your Machine – Check the sponge-bar

    Many of the domestic knitting machines contain a needle retaining bar also known as a sponge-bar or sponge bar. Passaps, Superbas, some plastic bed machines and some really old machines do not have a sponge bar. Check if your machine has one. The sponge-bar is a long metal metal bar that contains a strip of foam that holds down the needles. The needles will not knit properly without a sponge-bar in good condition. The manuals do not seem to mention anything about the sponge-bar.  The sponge-bar on a Japanese metal bed knitting machine is found in a channel near the front of the machine.  You need to pull or push…

  • getting started,  machine knitting

    Setting up Your Machine – First get your Operation Manual

    Hopefully your knitting machine has arrived, and your knitting table has been set up.  You are now ready to start setting up your machine. Get Your Manual Your machine will usually come with its operating manual or user guide.  This manual is absolutely necessary to understand how to set-up and operate your machine.  If your machine did not come with a manual, then I strongly suggest that you try and find a second-hand one if possible.  Ask in the facebook groups or set-up an alert on Ebay. Alternatively, you can download pdf formats of most manuals at www.machineknittingetc.com.  You should be to take the file to a local printers and…

  • a new knitting machine
    getting started,  machine knitting

    Got my Knitting Machine…Now what do I do?

    First, if you have your first knitting machine, or it is on it’s way to you, congratulations.  This is the start of your new hobby. You will probably be excited to start knitting.  But this may not be possible yet.  You need to prepare your knitting area and machine before you can start.  This post will go through the things that you need to do/get before you can start. If your machine is an new or old Knitmaster/Silver Reed/Singer/Studio standard gauge machine, then this blog is perfect for you as I will be showing you what to do on a Knitmaster standard gauge machine.   However, if you have a different…

  • getting started,  machine knitting

    Where to Buy your Knitting Machine?

    If you have read the previous post, you should have a good idea of what type of machine you want to purchase. You need to look for the best one that you can buy within your budget. For example, if you want to buy a standard gauge punch-card machine, then you can buy a new SK280 for approx £700, a reconditioned and tested machine for about £400 and an second-hand bargain for £100-300. The cheaper machines tend to be older and may not have been used for a while. Cheaper bargains can be found if you are willing to clean and service them yourself (you can find info and videos…

  • getting started,  machine knitting

    What is a Domestic Knitting Machine – Part 2?

    The 1970s/80s introduced garment shaping or contour devices or charting devices that provided visual pattern guides as an alternative to written instructions. The Knitmaster version was called a KnitRadar or Knit Contour and the Brother version was called a KnitLeader.  Some knitting machines had these incorporated into the main bed, but external ones could be purchased and attached (as shown above). A set of Pattern Contours came with the device in a range of sizes. The knitter chose the correct pattern to insert into the device. The device also included a gauge scale ruler and a set of stitch scales. A tension square was created and the gauge scale ruler…